JAMES THOMAS

Clippings to read, watch and listen

Archive for April 2011

Weather Symbols

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http://www.weathergraphics.com
http://aurora.aos.wisc.edu/~hoover/aos101S301/wxcode1.gif

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Written by James Thomas

11/04/2011 at 16:32

Desert Aqua-Net Plan

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From: SHIMIZU CORPORATION

Creating Lakes in the Desert: A Proposal for Creating a Network of Canals and Exploring New Ways to Inhabit Our Planet

The Desert Aqua-Net Plan is a concept for making use of the desert, which currently accounts for some one-third of the Earth’s total land area.
According to this idea, multiple manmade lakes will be created in depressed areas of deserts, after which artificial islands will be built on the lakes. Filled with seawater introduced through canals, the lakes will then be connected to form a water network.
By creating waterways in the desert and transforming arid and semiarid areas into inhabitable land, this plan (which is still in the simulation stage) ultimately seeks to build cities on manmade islands that have been formed on seawater lakes.

Written by James Thomas

11/04/2011 at 14:51

Posted in 004/ Environment

Outputting the Results

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From: http://cnx.org/content/m12467/latest/

https://i0.wp.com/cnx.org/content/m12467/latest/StravNoteScoreNew.jpg

The above graphical output method is the result of our attempts to present an intuitive representation of our data.  The goal is to produce an output which is most useful for someone completely unfamiliar with graphical methods yet intimately familiar with music.  Thus, we graph each window as an image with colors assigned to the various values of the data inside the window.  The result is something that looks surprisingly like a musical score.  The more “intense” or colorful a particular region seems, the more likely it is to be a note played within that window.  The chromatic scale serves to display the merits of this startling technique with distinction.

The first graph below this paragraph is the graphical interpretation of Stravinsky’s Three Pieces for Clarinet using this method for processing our data described in this section.  It serves the same purpose as the preceding Stravinsky graphs.

The most useful application of this graphical method, however, is that one may readily view several notes playing at once.  This form is best embodied in the final two graphs.  To first gather some sense of how to interpret the graph when multiple instruments are playing, the second graph below this paragraph shows a stripped-down version of the output from our program when it is fed the first 90.703 seconds (4,000,000 samples) of Barber’s Adagio for Strings as played by a clarinet choir.  A choir in its most general sense is merely the gathering of multiple like-familied instruments.  That is, all sorts of vocal instrumentation (soprano, alto, tenor, bass) form the most standard interpretation of choir.  Thus, a clarinet choir is one in which several members of the clarinet family (Eb, Bb, A, Alto/Eb, Bass, Contrabass, etc.) play in one ensemble.  The final graph on this page displays the output for Barber’s Adagio For Strings in all its glory.

MUSICAL DATA FROM SOFTWARE – BINARY CODES?
TRANSLATE MUSIC INTO SCORE

Written by James Thomas

11/04/2011 at 14:28

Posted in 005/ Tunings

Drone!

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From: Pruned

Inhabiting Sewers-on-Stilts Hacked As Urban Sonic Drone Machines

 

DEMILIT

Written by James Thomas

11/04/2011 at 14:16

Posted in 005/ Tunings

The Hole: Brooklyn/Queens

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Written by James Thomas

11/04/2011 at 11:13

Posted in 004/ Environment